managed vs unmanaged switch

Yet, it’s important to look at not just the size, but the features that you might need and the complexity of the network. For instance, security may play a large role in your choice. Even if your network is relatively small, if there is a lot of highly sensitive data (customer data, financial details, etc.) being transmitted across the network, then managed data switches may still be the most appropriate choice. Similarly, if your business frequently works with clients and partners that need a temporary, limited degree of access to your network, then the VLAN function of the managed switch might be necessary to ensure security.

Learn More About the Best Network Switch for You with a Network Technician
If you’ve read all of the points above and you’re still not certain whether an unmanaged network is enough to meet your needs or if you have crossed the line where a managed switch is necessary, you need an expert. At Field Engineer, it’s easy to tap into an international network of IT experts, including network technicians, which can make sure that you’re choosing not just the right network switch, but that you’re creating a network that’s secure, efficient, and has all the features that you need.

Switches come in various sizes that allow them to have any number of ports up to 48, but the differences go deeper than that when it comes to managed switches and unmanaged switches. Here, we’re going to define the two types, look at the differences between them, and help you decide which is right for you.

Features
An unmanaged switch is simple, connecting Ethernet devices with a fixed configuration that you cannot make any changes to, often used for small networks or to add temporary groups of systems to a larger network. A managed switch, on the other hand, also allows you to manage, configure, and monitor the settings of your LAN, including controls over LAN traffic, prioritizing certain channels, and create new virtual LANs to keep smaller groups of devices segregated and to better manage their traffic. Managed switches also offer redundancy features that duplicate and recovery data in the event of a device or network failure.

managed vs unmanaged switch